NEWS

Red Flag Warning, Heat Advisory issued

Red Flag Warning, Heat Advisory issued

(Sept. 28) The National Weather Service in San Diego has extended the current Red Flag Warning to 5 p.m. on Tuesday, June 29, for the inland valleys and mountains of San Diego County. The Red Flag Warning has been issued due to strong gusty winds and low humidity.

Areas will see winds from 15 to 25 mph with gusts up to 40 mph. Higher gusts are possible in the windiest locations.

A Red Flag Warning means that critical fire weather conditions are either occurring now or will shortly. A combination of strong winds, low relative humidity and warm temperatures can contribute to extreme fire behavior.

Fire Weather Watch was already issued and is in effect until 5 p.m. Monday, Sept. 28, for San Diego County valleys and mountains, according to the National Weather Service. A Fire Weather Watch means that critical fire weather conditions are forecast to occur. Expect strong, gusty winds and low humidity, especially Monday afternoon.

Any fires that develop may spread rapidly with extreme fire behavior, threatening life and property. Be prepared to evacuate if needed. Be sure your cell phone is registered with AlertSanDiego (https://www.readysandiego.org/content/oesready/en-us/alertsandiego.html), the county’s regional notification system to receive alerts directly to your mobile device.

For information and updates on power outages, visit www.sdge.com/Ready.

In addition, a Heat Advisory has been issued for inland San Diego County starting Tuesday, Sept. 29 from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 1.

Expect high temperatures of 96 to 102 degrees for the San Diego valleys.

Hot temperatures may cause heat illnesses to occur. Drink plenty of fluids, stay in an air-conditioned room, stay out of the sun and check up on relatives and neighbors. Young children and pets should never be left unattended in vehicles under any circumstances.

Take extra precautions if you work or spend time outside. When possible, reschedule strenuous activities to early morning or evening. Know the signs and symptoms of heat exhaustion and heat stroke. Wear lightweight and loose-fitting clothing when possible. To reduce risk during outdoor work, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration recommends scheduling frequent rest breaks in shaded or air conditioned environments. Anyone overcome by heat should be moved to a cool and shaded location. Heat stroke is an emergency, Call 9-1-1.

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